Sunday, February 16, 2020

Subsea Gas Compression News

Offshore Energy Outlook for 2020

Equinor’s Hywind Tampen project will use floating wind turbines to provide power to the Snorre and Gullfaks oil and gas production facilities.  (Image: Equinor)

The “new normal” is a phrase tossed around often in offshore energy circles today as those servicing and operating in the sector grapple with the harsh realities of the prolonged industry downturn. Operators, service companies and equipment suppliers have been forced to adjust to oil selling at prices well below the $100+ per barrel mark seen in years past.

Shell to Boost Ormen Lange Field Output

File Image: an offshore Equinor installation (CREDIT: Equinor)

Royal Dutch Shell aims to boost output and recoverable reserves from its Ormen Lange gas field off Norway by installing subsea compressors, the head of its Norwegian operations said on Wednesday.Output from Shell-operated Ormen Lange, Norway's second-largest gas field and one of the key external gas supply sources for Britain, has been gradually declining…

MAN’s Subsea Compressors Reach Field Proven Status

Photo: MAN Diesel & Turbo

Both subsea compression trains at Statoil’s Åsgard field have achieved more than 25,000 operation hours with an availability close to 100 percent. The world’s first subsea gas compression facility features two MAN Diesel & Turbo HOFIM motor-compressor units. The Åsgard subsea compression system has officially reached the highest Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 with both trains surpassing 10,000 operating hours.

30 years of Gullfaks oil - Statoil

Gullfaks C on its way to the field in 1989. (Photo Leif Berge Statoil)

Gullfaks was something of a final exam for Statoil – the first field where the company was both developer and operator. Since production started on 22 December 1986, 2.6 billion barrels of oil have passed the loading buoys. "Gullfaks is a prime example of the best that this industry has achieved in Norway," says Gunnar Nakken, senior vice president for the operations west cluster.

Running like a clock on the Seabed

Illustration of Åsgard subsea gas compression, see also the animation below. Photo Statoil

The world’s first subsea gas compression system has now been in operation for one year on the Åsgard field. The system has been running like a Swiss clock with practically no stops or interruptions. It was in September 2015 Statoil and its partners started up the world’s first subsea gas compression system on the Åsgard field in the Norwegian Sea. “Quality…

NPD’s IOR Prize Awarded to Åsgard Licence

Director General of the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate awarded the IOR prize (Photo: Ole Jørgen Bratland/Statoil)

Director General of the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD), Bente Nylund, announced at the ONS 2016 Tuesday that the Åsgard licence was awarded the NPD’s prize for improved oil recovery (IOR) for their Åsgard subsea gas compression effort. “The IOR prize has been given in recognition of their creativity, perseverance and venturousness in applying methods and technology for improving oil and gas recovery.

Statoil ASA: 2015 Q3 Results Announced

A Statoil offshore production field (image: Statoil)

Statoil delivered adjusted earnings of NOK 16.7 billion and adjusted earnings after tax of NOK 3.7 billion in the third quarter. Statoil reported net income in accordance with IFRS of negative NOK 2.8 billion, mainly due to net impairment charges and provisions. "We continue to reduce underlying operational costs and deliver a quarter with strong operational performance and solid results from marketing and trading.

Statoil Starts Subsea Gas Compression at Gullfaks

The unique technology will increase recovery by 22 million barrels of oil equivalent (oe) and extend plateau production by around two years from the Gullfaks South Brent reservoir. “We are very proud that we have been able to complete such a demanding pioneering project with start-up ahead of the original plan,” says Margareth Øvrum, executive vice president for Technology, Projects & Drilling (TPD).

Statoil, Partners Start Subsea Gas Compression

World´s first wet gas compression on the seabed of the North Sea Gullfaks field.

The unique technology will increase recovery by 22 million barrels of oil equivalent (oe) and extend plateau production by around two years from the Gullfaks South Brent reservoir. “We are very proud that we have been able to complete such a demanding pioneering project with start-up ahead of the original plan,” says Margareth Øvrum, executive vice president for Technology, Projects & Drilling (TPD).

Aker Delivers World's First Subsea Compression System

World's First Subsea Compression System

The world's first subsea gas compression system went on stream yesterday at the Statoil-operated Åsgard field. Aker Solutions has delivered the subsea compression system for this field development. "We're immensely proud to be part of this achievement, which is a major milestone for our industry," said Aker Solutions' Chief Executive Officer Luis Araujo.

First Subsea Gas Compression Plant On Line

June 2015: Installation work at the Asgard field, with the North Sea Giant vessel.

Statoil and its partners this week put the first subsea gas compression facility on line at Åsgard in the Norwegian Sea, Statoil announced. Subsea compression will add some 306 million barrels of oil equivalent to total output over the field’s life. This subsea technology milestone opens new opportunities in deeper waters, and in areas far from shore.

Statoil to Start First Subsea Gas Compressor in September

Norway's Statoil plans to commission in September the world's first subsea gas compression facility, a technology that could prove significant for oil companies as they seek to move offshore equipment to the seabed, away from ice and storms. Statoil called the facility, supplied by Norway's Aker Solutions, "a quantum leap" in subsea technology. "Such technology has never been tested in the world before…

Asgard Gas Compression Lowered into Place

A special handling system makes the installation work safer and more efficient on the Åsgard field.

The installation of the modules that collectively constitute Asgard subsea gas compression has commenced on the Asgard field. Innovative technology at a depth of 300 metres will create 282 million extra barrels from the Asgard field. A total of 22 modules will be installed and connected. These comprise two identical compressor trains weighing 1,500 tonnes each.

Shell to Revisit Norway's Ormen Lange Gas Project

Oil and gas giant Royal Dutch Shell could restart work on offshore compression at its Ormen Lange gas field in Norway in the first quarter of 2016, after stopping the project in April, it said on Wednesday. Studies of the gas reservoir's behaviour have also shown that the delay in the project will not affect how much gas could be produced over the lifetime of the field…

Cost Blowouts on Norway's New Oil Developments

Goliat FPSO, Photo courtesy of Eni

Several key oil and gas developments in Norway will cost much more than earlier expected and fields with approved development plans are now seen 10 percent more expensive than originally planned, the oil and energy ministry said on Wednesday. Costs in Norway's offshore oil sector, already one of the most expensive in the world, have soared in recent years…

TE Connectors on Display at ONS 2014

At this year’s Offshore Northern Seas Conference and Exhibition (ONS 2014) in Stavanger, Norway, TE Connectivity will showcase its latest wet-mate connectors and penetrators used in the world’s first subsea gas compression station located in the Norwegian Sea. Wet-mate connectors enable the supply of power to modular subsea boosting and gas compression systems and interconnect system components like umbilicals…

Subsea Energy Production Beats Topside Method Says ABB

Subsea Aasgard Field: Image courtesy of ABB

ABB recently entered a partnership with international energy company Statoil to develop power solutions for subsea oil and gas production. A key challenge they identify is to develop reliable long-distance power transmission technology and to build components that can function for several decades at depths of up to 3,000 meters. The subsea industry has…